Blogs

Green Tea

Green tea is particularly rich in health-promoting flavonoids (which account for 30% of the dry weight of a leaf), including catechins and their derivatives. The most abundant catechin in green tea is epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), which is thought to play a pivotal role in the green tea's anticancer and antioxidant effects. Catechins should be considered right alongside of the better-known antioxidants like vitamins E and C as potent free radical scavengers and health-supportive for this reason.

Limes

The lime is the sweeter cousin of the lemon with a distinctive flavor that’s reminiscent of the Caribbean. Have you ever wondered why a person, especially a sailor from Britain, used to be called a Limey? In 1493, the passion for this fruit began to spread. British explorers dominated the world trade routes with their steady supply of limes from the West Indies. When many ships fell to scurvy (a disease caused by a deficiency of vitamin C), the British survived because of their constant supply of this diminutive citrus. Limes are good for women’s health.

Rutabaga

Rutabagas, occasionally known as yellow turnips, give rise to your veggie intake for the entire day, which can be between 2 and 3 cups, in accordance with the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The plant, a mixture of a turnip along with a cabbage, originated from Russia however grows through the entire United States. Rutabagas provide health benefits because of their important nutrient content.

Summer Squash

No category of health benefits from summer squash is better researched than the category of antioxidant benefits. As an excellent source of manganese and a very good source of vitamin C. summer squash provides us with a great combination of conventional antioxidant nutrients. But it also contains an unusual amount of other antioxidant nutrients, including the carotenoids lutein and zexanthin. These antioxidants are especially helpful in antioxidant protection of the eye, including protection against age-related macular degeneration and cataracts.

Strawberries

Given their unique combination of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory nutrients, it's not surprising to see strong research support for strawberry health benefits in three major areas: (1) cardiovascular support and prevention of cardiovascular diseases (2) improved regulation of blood sugar, with decreased risk of type 2 diabetes, and (3) prevention of certain cancer types including breast, cervical, colon, and esophageal cancer. In this section, we'll review the outstanding research-based benefits of strawberries in each area. 

Celery

Celery is an important food source of conventional antioxidant nutrients, including vitamin C, beta-carotene, and manganese. But its "claim to fame" in terms of antioxidant nutrients may very well be its phytonutrients. Many of these phytonutrients fall into the category of phenolic antioxidants and have been shown to provide anti-inflammatory benefits as well. Below is a representative list of the phenolic antioxidants found in celery. 

Kiwi

Kiwifruit can offer a great deal more than an exotic tropical flair in your fruit salad. These emerald delights contain numerous phytonutrients as well as well known vitamins and minerals that promote your health. 

Garlic

Garlic is well known as a natural health remedy that has long been used to treat various ailments. It is extremely easy to source in most countries and can be consumed cooked or fresh. It is most easily included in your food or can be eaten on its own. You don’t need to limit yourself to fresh garlic either. Garlic powder or dried garlic flakes are just as effective and super easy to keep in the cupboard for everyday use. 

It is recommended that adults consume no more than one clove two or three times a day and those children have one quarter to one half a clove, once or twice a day.

Tangerines

Like most citrus fruits, tangerines are rich in vitamin C, which is good for your immunity. Vitamin C works to boost your immunity by acting as an antioxidant that protects your cells from the damage caused by free radicals. Free radicals are highly reactive atoms that are produced when the substances in your body react with each other. This process is called oxidation, and the free radicals that oxidation produces can trigger cell death. Vitamin C's antioxidant power comes from its ability to scavenge free radicals and disarm their propensity for damage.

Cucumbers

Cucumbers have not received as much press as other vegetables in terms of health benefits, but this widely cultivated food provides us with a unique combination of nutrients. At the top of the phytonutrient list for cucumbers are its cucurbitacins, lignans, and flavonoids. These three types of phytonutrients found in cucumbers provide us with valuable antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer benefits.

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