Paprika

Paprika -- made by grinding capsicum peppers into a fine powder -- adds vibrant red color and a rich, pungent flavor to a variety of meals. At 19 calories per tablespoon, paprika adds only a negligible amount to your daily calorie intake, but it comes packed with nutrients. Just a single 1-tablespoon serving provides ample amounts of several beneficial nutrients, especially carotenoids -- a nutrient family that includes vitamin A.

Peppermint

In the midst of all the indulgence and decadence this time of year, it's comforting to know there are some very real health benefits to some of the most common flavors of the season. Between candy canes and Christmas bark, peppermint is giving cinnamon a run for its money as standout spice of the holiday season. And we're thankful for that, considering the new research and amazing benefits including the following:

Green Tea

Green tea is particularly rich in health-promoting flavonoids (which account for 30% of the dry weight of a leaf), including catechins and their derivatives. The most abundant catechin in green tea is epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), which is thought to play a pivotal role in the green tea's anticancer and antioxidant effects. Catechins should be considered right alongside of the better-known antioxidants like vitamins E and C as potent free radical scavengers and health-supportive for this reason.

Limes

The lime is the sweeter cousin of the lemon with a distinctive flavor that’s reminiscent of the Caribbean. Have you ever wondered why a person, especially a sailor from Britain, used to be called a Limey? In 1493, the passion for this fruit began to spread. British explorers dominated the world trade routes with their steady supply of limes from the West Indies. When many ships fell to scurvy (a disease caused by a deficiency of vitamin C), the British survived because of their constant supply of this diminutive citrus. Limes are good for women’s health.

Rutabaga

Rutabagas, occasionally known as yellow turnips, give rise to your veggie intake for the entire day, which can be between 2 and 3 cups, in accordance with the U.S. Department of Agriculture. The plant, a mixture of a turnip along with a cabbage, originated from Russia however grows through the entire United States. Rutabagas provide health benefits because of their important nutrient content.

Summer Squash

No category of health benefits from summer squash is better researched than the category of antioxidant benefits. As an excellent source of manganese and a very good source of vitamin C. summer squash provides us with a great combination of conventional antioxidant nutrients. But it also contains an unusual amount of other antioxidant nutrients, including the carotenoids lutein and zexanthin. These antioxidants are especially helpful in antioxidant protection of the eye, including protection against age-related macular degeneration and cataracts.

Strawberries

Given their unique combination of antioxidant and anti-inflammatory nutrients, it's not surprising to see strong research support for strawberry health benefits in three major areas: (1) cardiovascular support and prevention of cardiovascular diseases (2) improved regulation of blood sugar, with decreased risk of type 2 diabetes, and (3) prevention of certain cancer types including breast, cervical, colon, and esophageal cancer. In this section, we'll review the outstanding research-based benefits of strawberries in each area. 

Celery

Celery is an important food source of conventional antioxidant nutrients, including vitamin C, beta-carotene, and manganese. But its "claim to fame" in terms of antioxidant nutrients may very well be its phytonutrients. Many of these phytonutrients fall into the category of phenolic antioxidants and have been shown to provide anti-inflammatory benefits as well. Below is a representative list of the phenolic antioxidants found in celery. 

Vitamin B3

Certain vitamins are powerful at burning body fat in the body. Niacin or nicotinic acid (B3) is a powerful vitamin that we can’t perform well without. It also helps to lower cholesterol and support healthy blood sugar levels. A slight, non-clinical deficiency can lead to fatigue, poor concentration, anxiety, depression, and restlessness. It is difficult to get too much of this vitamin, however, if you do, it will lead to flushing, skin issues, and digestive challenges. If it is long-term overdose it can lead to liver damage, diabetes, and even birth defects.

Kiwi

Kiwifruit can offer a great deal more than an exotic tropical flair in your fruit salad. These emerald delights contain numerous phytonutrients as well as well known vitamins and minerals that promote your health. 

Pages