Mango

Research has shown antioxidant compounds in mango fruit have been found to protect against colon, breast, leukemia and prostate cancers. These compounds include quercetin, isoquercitrin, astragalin, fisetin, gallic acid and methylgallat, as well as the abundant enzymes. The high levels of fiber, pectin and vitamin C help to lower serum cholesterol levels, specifically Low-Density Lipoprotein (the bad stuff). Can be used both internally and externally for the skin. Mangos clear clogged pores and eliminate pimples. One cup of sliced mangoes supplies 25 percent of the needed daily value of vitamin A, which promotes good eyesight and prevents night blindness and dry eyes.

Cayenne Pepper

Hot and spicy, cayenne pepper adds zest to flavorful dishes around the world and health to those brave enough to risk its fiery heat. The hotness produced by cayenne is caused by its high concentration of a substance called capsaicin. Technically referred to as 8-methyul-N-vanillyl-6-nonenamide, capsaicin has been widely studied for its pain-reducing effects, its cardiovascular benefits, and its ability to help prevent ulcers. Capsaicin also effectively opens and drains congested nasal passages. 

Asparagus

It's not surprising to see asparagus being heralded as an anti-inflammatory food because it provides a truly unique combination of anti-inflammatory nutrients. Among these anti-inflammatory nutrients are asparagus saponins, including asparanin A, sarsasapogenin, protodioscin, and diosgenin.

Grapes

Few fruits have garnered as much attention in the health research literature as grapes. Part of the reason may be their widespread presence in diets worldwide. With the exception of Antarctica, grapes are cultivated on all of the earth's continents, and researchers from many different countries have been especially interested in this food. But an even greater part of the reason involves the amazing nutrient composition of grapes themselves. Every year, it seems like the list of health-supportive grape nutrients grow longer, and it can be challenging just to keep up with the many phytonutrients provided by this popular food.

Eggs

Eggs have long been recognized as a source of high-quality protein. The World Health Organization (WHO) and other public health authorities actually use eggs as their reference standard for evaluating the protein quality in all other foods. Egg protein is usually referred to as "HBV" protein, meaning protein with High Biological Value. Since eggs are used as the reference standard for food protein, they score 100% on the HBV chart. The high quality of egg protein is based on the mixture of amino acids it contains.

Top Foods For Breast and Prostate Cancer

Certain foods can help win the battle against two of the leading killers in America today. These key super foods are known to significantly reduces the chances of occurrence. This new study from Harvard shows us that we need to start educating our kids on the importance of quality nutrition now, rather than “eat whatever you want, you’re young” mentality. Remember the seeds that we sow now will create the harvest that we will have tomorrow. Cancer and other health challenges are created in 10 year increments. What you do in your twenties will show up in your thirties, and so on. 

Baking Soda

In 1918, the Spanish flu was sweeping the country. This deadly strain of the flu ended up killing an incredible 50 to 100 million people worldwide, 3-6% of the world’s population at that time. And yet doctors eventually figured out that there was a fairly effective way to prevent the flu. The answer lied with baking soda.

Baking soda works wonders eliminating bad odors. And, that includes bad breath. Simply mix 1 tablespoon of baking soda with 1 cup of hydrogen peroxide, to gargle. Bacteria love slightly acidic environments, which is why so many people get bladder infections. The environment in the bladder is a perfect breeding ground for bacteria.

Paprika

Paprika -- made by grinding capsicum peppers into a fine powder -- adds vibrant red color and a rich, pungent flavor to a variety of meals. At 19 calories per tablespoon, paprika adds only a negligible amount to your daily calorie intake, but it comes packed with nutrients. Just a single 1-tablespoon serving provides ample amounts of several beneficial nutrients, especially carotenoids -- a nutrient family that includes vitamin A.

Peppermint

In the midst of all the indulgence and decadence this time of year, it's comforting to know there are some very real health benefits to some of the most common flavors of the season. Between candy canes and Christmas bark, peppermint is giving cinnamon a run for its money as standout spice of the holiday season. And we're thankful for that, considering the new research and amazing benefits including the following:

Green Tea

Green tea is particularly rich in health-promoting flavonoids (which account for 30% of the dry weight of a leaf), including catechins and their derivatives. The most abundant catechin in green tea is epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), which is thought to play a pivotal role in the green tea's anticancer and antioxidant effects. Catechins should be considered right alongside of the better-known antioxidants like vitamins E and C as potent free radical scavengers and health-supportive for this reason.

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